Today’s national average is 19 cents more expensive than a month ago, but remains significantly cheaper – 53 cents – than a year ago. - Photo: AAA.

Today’s national average is 19 cents more expensive than a month ago, but remains significantly cheaper – 53 cents – than a year ago.

Photo: AAA.

The national average price for gasoline rose to $2.13 continuing a gradual rise following record lows amid the COVID-19 pandemic, though the rate at which gas prices are increasing across the country is slowing, according to AAA.

Today’s national average is 19 cents more expensive than a month ago, but remains significantly cheaper – 53 cents – than a year ago, AAA found.

The slower rate of increases can be tied to demand. Measuring at 7.87 million barrels per day, gasoline demand saw a small week-over-week decline and continues to be significantly lower (21%) compared to this week last year.

“Demand levels are likely to ebb and flow in the coming weeks as people continue to be cautious about travel,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. As a result, pump prices will likely continue to increase, but at a slower rate through the end of the month.

The nation’s largest weekly increases include Delaware (up 10 cents), West Virginia (up 9 cents), North Dakota (up 9 cents), Montana (up 8 cents), Washington, D.C. (up 6 cents), Virginia (up 6 cents), Colorado (up 6 cents), Ohio (up 6 cents), Maryland (up 5 cents) and Wisconsin (up 5 cents).

The nation’s least expensive markets include Mississippi ($1.76), Louisiana ($1.79), Alabama ($1.83), Arkansas ($1.83), Texas ($1.83), Oklahoma ($1.84), Missouri ($1.85), South Carolina ($1.86), Tennessee ($1.89) and Kansas ($1.92).

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