During the first week of June for the past five years, gas prices have typically averaged $2.81. - Graphic: AAA

During the first week of June for the past five years, gas prices have typically averaged $2.81.

Graphic: AAA

The national average price for gasoline finally rose past the $2 average, reaching to $2.03, though prices are still significantly cheaper year-over-year, said AAA.

During the first week of June for the past five years, gas prices have typically averaged $2.81.

U.S. gasoline demand continues to show increasing strength. The Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) latest reading shows a 4% weekly increase at 7.5 million barrels per day. That is the highest demand level since states began issuing stay-at-home orders in mid-March.

“The beginning of June has not seen gas prices this low since 2004,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “As crude oil prices trend higher and gasoline demand increases, Americans will see gas prices push more expensive, but this summer will be cheaper than last.”

The nation’s largest weekly increases includes Colorado (up 13 cents), Indiana (up 12 cents), Missouri (up 11 cents), Montana (up 10 cents), Kentucky (up 10 cents), Michigan (up 9 cents), Kansas (up 9 cents), Alabama (up 8 cents), Tennessee (up 8 cents) and Alaska (up 8 cents).

The nation’s least expensive markets include Mississippi ($1.66), Texas ($1.69), Louisiana ($1.70), Arkansas ($1.71), Alabama ($1.72), Oklahoma ($1.73), South Carolina ($1.73), Missouri ($1.76), Kansas ($1.77) and Virginia ($1.79).

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