Nevada is considering allowing police to use a so-called textalyzer for drivers suspected of texting while driving.
 - Photo via W/Flickr.

Nevada is considering allowing police to use a so-called textalyzer for drivers suspected of texting while driving.

Photo via W/Flickr.

Nevada is considering legislation that would allow police to use a device known as a "textalyzer," which connects to a cell phone and looks for user activity, to determine if a driver was texting during a car crash, reports the Associated Press. 

If the measure passes, Nevada could be one of the first states to allow police to use the technology to test for cellphone use at the scene of the crime. 

Presently, New York, New Jersey, Tennessee, and the city of Chicago are considering similar legislation to curb distracted driving, reports The Washington Post. 

However, the Nevada legislative proposal is raising privacy concerns. The American Civil Liberties Union says that allowing law enforcement to use the technology without a warrant would violate Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure, notes the Post. 

Made by Israel-based Cellebrite, the "textalyzer" can scan a cellphone for recent activity like social media messaging, game playing and web browsing, and provide an associated timestamp. The company, however, denies that the "textalyzer" would collect or store any personal information, note reports. 

Nearly 3,500 people lost their lives to distracted driving in 2016 alone and 14% of those fatalities were linked to cellphone use, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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