The national average price for gasoline is a nickel more than last week, but is still cheaper year-over-year by 17 cents. - Photo: AAA

The national average price for gasoline is a nickel more than last week, but is still cheaper year-over-year by 17 cents.

Photo: AAA

The average national price for gasoline is at $2.38, an increase from the week prior as the average has increased 13 cents since the beginning of the year.

The national average price for gasoline is a nickel more than last week, but is still cheaper year-over-year by 17 cents, according to AAA.

The last time the nation saw a substantial January pump price increase was in 2009. That year, the national gas price average jumped 23 cents inside of the first three weeks of the year, according to AAA. At that time U.S. gasoline demand and supply were lower and crude oil prices had been increasing, similar to today.

Gas prices have been rising this year as crude oil prices continue to increase — last week pricing as high as $53 per barrel, though gasoline demand is low.

“The higher price of crude is outweighing sustained low gasoline demand and a build in gasoline supply,” said Jeanette Casselano McGee, AAA spokesperson. “Motorists can expect gas prices to continue to climb through at least the end of the month.”

On the week, every state saw an increase at the pump, with 14 state averages jumping at least seven cents, AAA said.

The nation’s top 10 largest year-over-year decreases includes Arizona (down 43 cents), Alaska (down 40 cents), Utah (down 37 cents), Wyoming (down 35 cents), Idaho (down 34 cents), Hawaii (down 34 cents), Oregon (down 32 cents), Washington (down 32 cents), Vermont (down 28 cents) and Colorado (down 28 cents).  

Meanwhile, the nation’s top 10 least expensive markets were Mississippi ($2.08), Missouri ($2.10), Louisiana ($2.10), Oklahoma ($2.10), Texas ($2.12), Arkansas ($2.15), South Carolina ($2.16), Alabama ($2.17), Kansas ($2.18) and Tennessee ($2.18).

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