Roadway deaths have increased in the U.S. by the highest percentage between 2010 and 2016 among 29 countries, according to a new study.
 - Photo via Thue/Wikimedia.

Roadway deaths have increased in the U.S. by the highest percentage between 2010 and 2016 among 29 countries, according to a new study.

Photo via Thue/Wikimedia.

Roadway deaths increased in the U.S. by the highest percentage between 2010 and 2016 among 29 countries, accounting for nearly half of the group's total fatalities in 2016, according to a new study.

The findings come from a recent study by the International Transport Forum that explores data reported by member countries of the International Road Traffic Data and Analysis group (IRTAD).

Argentina ranked second with a 9% increase in traffic fatalities for the same time period. Chile came in third with a 5% increase, followed by Sweden, which experienced a 1.5% increase. Iceland saw 10 more deaths and Luxembourg remained stable.

All other countries in the study saw traffic deaths decrease in 2016 as compared with 2010.

In fact, overall traffic fatalities were down 3.6% in 2016 as compared to 2010. When the U.S. is excluded from the data comparison, the reduction is nearly 15%, according to the study.

Benchmarked against 2010 results, the number of traffic deaths has fallen in 26 countries in the group in 2016.

The U.S. has also seen the highest increase in pedestrian deaths (39.2%) and a 34.8% increase in cyclist deaths in 2016 versus 2010.

The study's authors attribute favorable economic factors, which lead to more cars on the road, and an increase in distracted driving to the increase in roadway fatalities in the U.S.

Read the complete report here.

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