The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Seatbelt Issue Spurs GM Crossover Recall

August 18, 2010

WASHINGTON - General Motors Corp. is recalling more than 207,000 crossovers because of a potential problem with the second row of seatbelts, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 

The recall affects MY 2009-2010 models of the Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia and Saturn Outlook. 

The second-row-seat side trim shield may restrict the upward rotation of the safety belt buckle when the seat back is returned to a seating position after being folded flat. If the buckle contacts the seat frame, the task of returning the seat to a seating position may become more difficult. If a high level of force is applied, the buckle cover could be pushed down the strap, exposing and partially depressing the red release button. As a result, the safety belt would be ineffective and fail to protect the occupant during a crash. 

Dealers will modify the second-row-seat side trim shields. If a safety belt is damaged, dealers will also replace it free of charge. 

The safety recall is expected to begin around Aug. 31. 

Twitter Facebook Google+

Comments

Please note that comments may be moderated. 
Leave this field empty:
 
 

Fleet Incentives

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

FleetFAQ

Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Todd Ewing from Verizon Connect will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Fleet Management And Leasing

Jack Firriolo from Merchants will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Fuel Management

Bernie Kanavagh from WEX will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Sponsored by

In the United States, the specific terminology, “Full Service Lease,” is typically used in heavy-duty truck leasing where lessor responsibilities often include garaging, washing, the provision of replacement trucks for use when the leased truck is out of service because of maintenance requirements, and occasionally, even fuel.

Read more

Up Next

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher