In July, Florida enacted a broader law that made texting behind the wheel a primary traffic offense, which means that police can stop drivers specifically for texting as opposed to writing a citation for texting only after they've pulled over a driver for another offense.
 - Photo credit: Flickr – Chris Betcher

In July, Florida enacted a broader law that made texting behind the wheel a primary traffic offense, which means that police can stop drivers specifically for texting as opposed to writing a citation for texting only after they've pulled over a driver for another offense.

Photo credit: Flickr – Chris Betcher

On October 1, drivers in a designated school crossing, school zone, or an active work zone will be prohibited from using electronic devices unless they do so in a hands-free manner, reports Fox4.

While law enforcement plans to issue warnings until January, ultimately, violators will face a $30 penalty for the first offense and a $60 fine for a second offense. In addition, motorists who break the rule will be subject to court fees and receive points on their driver’s license.

In July, Florida enacted a broader law that made texting behind the wheel a primary traffic offense, which means that police can stop drivers specifically for texting as opposed to writing a citation for texting only after they've pulled over a driver for another offense. That measure left just a handful of states — Ohio, Nebraska, and South Dakota — with laws that categorize texting while driving as a secondary offense.

However, the Florida texting ban does not prohibit drivers from using a navigation system while operating their vehicle or from texting when the vehicle is stopped.

Distracted driving claimed over 3,100 lives in 2017 alone, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

0 Comments