Nearly half of drivers are texting or using video chat when they have advanced safety technology engaged, according to a new State Farm study.
 - Photo via Amanda Mills/Freestockphotos.biz.

Nearly half of drivers are texting or using video chat when they have advanced safety technology engaged, according to a new State Farm study.

Photo via Amanda Mills/Freestockphotos.biz.

Some 62% of drivers with adaptive cruise control say they read or send texts while driving as compared with just 49% of drivers without adaptive cruise control, according to a new survey from State Farm.

The study also found that 42% of motorists with lane keeping assist engage in video chats while driving as compared with just 20% of drivers who don't have that technology in their vehicle.

While advanced driver assist features offer promising safety benefits, they are designed to work in conjunction with engaged driver behaviors. However, the survey authors conclude that drivers who actively use advanced safety tech in their vehicles are instead taking more risks with their own behaviors.

When it comes to adaptive cruise control, 56% of drivers who use it say they also interact with cell phone apps frequently or sometimes while behind the wheel versus 42% of drivers who don't use ACC. In addition, 52% of users say they manually enter a phone number while driving as compared with just 38% of non-users.

As for holding a phone while talking, 60% of users admit to doing so as compared with 50% of those who don't use adaptive cruise control. Finally, while some 39% of the users engage in video chatting behind the wheel just 19% of those who don't use it say they do so.

Drivers who use lane keeping assist are equally prone to falling into risky behavior patterns while operating their vehicles.

For example, 62% of users said they read or send texts while driving as compared with 51% of non-users of the technology. Some 54% of users said they interact with cell phone apps behind the wheel as compared with 44% of non-users.

While 56% of drivers with the technology admit to manually entering a phone number, only 38% of drivers without the technology say they do the same. When it comes to holding a phone while talking as they drive, 63% of drivers say they do so sometimes or frequently as compared with 51% of drivers without the technology.

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