AAA has proposed a set of standardized technology names for describing an array of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).
 - Photo courtesy of AAA.

AAA has proposed a set of standardized technology names for describing an array of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

Photo courtesy of AAA.

In an effort to clear up confusion for motorists when researching or using advanced safety systems, AAA has proposed a set of standardized technology names for describing an array of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

While at least one ADAS feature is available in nearly 93% of new vehicle models in the U.S. since May 2018, AAA says the plethora of marketing names makes it challenging for consumers to discern what features a vehicle has and how they actually work.

For example, AAA found that manufacturers presently use 40 unique names to market automatic emergency braking, 20 to brand their adaptive cruise control, and 19 to market lane keeping assistance.

The terminology used to describe these safety features varies so widely that it is easy for a driver to misunderstand what a particular system does and the safety value of each. For example, previous AAA research found that 40% of Americans expect partially automated driving systems with names like Autopilot, ProPILOT or Pilot Assist, to have the ability to drive the car by itself. 

AAA is proposing limiting ADAS terminology to three to six basic system names under five feature categories—Automated Driving Tasks, Collision Alerts, Collision Mitigation, Parking Assistance, and Visual Driving Aids.

The proposed terminology is intended to be simple, specific and based on system functionality.

The organization is seeking to create a dialog with the automotive industry, safety organizations and legislators about the need for common naming of ADAS. Its proposed terminology is a first step toward that effort, and AAA welcomes further input from all stakeholders.

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