The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Video Safety Tip: Driving in Snow

November 6, 2017

VIDEO: Driving in Wintry Conditions

Some areas of the country — from Seattle, Wash., to Asheville, N.C. — recently experienced the first snow of the season. It’s time again to remind drivers of the extra precautions necessary while driving in snow.

Here are some tips from AAA:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember, it takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning — nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • Increase the normal dry pavement following distance (three to four seconds) to eight to 10 seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
  • Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed downhill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • If possible, stay home or in the office during snowstorms. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate. If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors. 

To view a AAA video with more winter driving advice, click on the photo or link below the headline.

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