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CARTASITE GPS Technology Used to Recover $1.5 Million in Stolen Art and Furniture

May 16, 2006

DENVER – Authorities in Gainesville recovered $1.5 million in artwork and furniture that went missing in April when a driver hired to haul the goods from Boca Raton to New York City allegedly absconded with the loot.

A 24-foot Budget rental truck was hired to haul furniture, photos, sculptures, and rare Milton Avery paintings. What the driver didn’t know was that the truck was equipped with CARTASITE’s GPS tracking module. Authorities used the tracking technology to pinpoint the truck’s exact location at a trailer park near Gainesville, where they apprehended the suspect.

“The irony is that Budget didn’t purchase our system as a theft recovery device,” stated David Armitage, CEO of CARTASITE. “They are utilizing it as an inventory management tool that allows them to have enough vehicles in the right location at the right time. The fact that it can also be used to handle rare situations like this is just a bonus.”

The Web-based solution designed by CARTASITE uses Microsoft software, wireless technology, and GPS to monitor the location, state, and condition of remote assets, supply chains, and distribution networks. CARTASITE’s solutions issue real-time alerts for situations that require immediate action but are primarily used to simply and effectively merge telematics systems, such as GPS tracking, with a company’s existing business processes. CARTASITE technology is suited for applications and markets including pick-up and delivery, food and beverage distribution, truck and auto fleets, OEM’s, and vehicle rentals.

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