Telematics provider Spireon has joined a collaborative effort to develop an open platform for the connected car.
 - Photo courtesy of Spireon.

Telematics provider Spireon has joined a collaborative effort to develop an open platform for the connected car.

Photo courtesy of Spireon.

Six new members, including telematics provider Spireon, have joined Automotive Grade Linux, a collaborative effort to develop an open platform for the connected car. Other new members include Kinetica, Neusoft, NXM Technologies, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, and Veniam. With the addition of these companies and organizations, the project is now 130 members strong.

“We are delighted to see six new members deepen their investment in automotive open source,” said Dan Cauchy, executive director of AGL and the Linux Foundation. “As we continue to advance our platform through the release of AGL UCB 6.0, expanding our global community is crucial. We look forward to further leveraging their expertise in embedded automotive technologies as we advance the connected car ecosystem.”

AGL will participate in this year’s Open Source Summit North America, which will be held Aug. 29–31, in Vancouver. Open Source Summit connects the open source ecosystem under one roof in a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward. Cauchy will present "Accelerating Connected & Autonomous Vehicles Through Open Source Software" on Thursday, Aug. 30.

"Spireon has nearly 4 million vehicles connected to our NSpire platform, and data from more than three hundred twenty-six billion driving miles under our belt, so we fully understand the challenges of a fragmented telematics ecosystem that the AGL project seeks to overcome," said Rick Gruenhagen, Spireon's chief technology officer. "A standardized software stack will accelerate autonomous and other connected vehicle benefits by helping solution providers like Spireon gain secure access to in-vehicle functions and data that have been locked in OEM-specific implementations until now."

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