Men engage in aggressive driving behaviors more than women, though these behaviors tend to skew toward younger generations. - Photo: AAA

Men engage in aggressive driving behaviors more than women, though these behaviors tend to skew toward younger generations.

Photo: AAA

Men engage in aggressive driving behaviors more than women, though these behaviors tend to skew toward younger generations, according to data gathered by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

Men tend to speed, tailgate, merge dangerously, and make rude gestures or honk at other drivers more than women, the report found.  

Roughly 52% of men were observed driving 15 mph over the speed limit on a freeway, compared to 44.6% of women. Also, 37.8% of men followed vehicles closely to prevent another vehicle from merging, and for women this was observed at 29.3%.

Meanwhile, 35.4% of men made rude gestures or honked at another driver, which was observed at 28% for women, comparatively.

Regardless of gender, nearly 8 in 10 American drivers demonstrate aggressive behaviors when driving, and speeding tops the list, the report found. 

A driver may be stressed or react wrongly to another driver’s action on any given day, the holidays can add to the strain and anxiety, and is further exacerbated by the pressures and concerns tied to a global pandemic, AAA said.

“If you encounter an aggressive driver on the road or find your temper rising, remember to slow yourself down, breathe deeply, and safely create distance between you and other motorists. Aggressive drivers are likely not thinking about their potential impact on others until it is too late,” said Jake Nelson, AAA’s director of traffic safety advocacy.

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