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CSA

ELD Violations Won't Count Against CSA Scores During Transition Period

Federal officials have taken another step to make the transition to mandatory electronic devices less painful. If drivers are cited at roadside for not complying with the ELD rule come the Dec. 18 deadline, the citation will be a “no points cite” that will not affect the Safety Measurement System that feeds into CSA scores – until April 1.

CSA Safety Scores Must Distinguish Between Preventable and Non-Preventable Accidents

A growing number of fleets contend that Compliance, Safety & Accountability (CSA) program is in need of substantial improvement. Currently, a fleet’s score in the CSA safety monitoring system is based on all fleet-involved crashes, including those that the company’s driver did not cause and could not reasonably have prevented. This scoring criteria is contrary to accepted industry standards and, in the long run, will undermine the validity of the CSA program in the eyes of covered fleets.

A Double Whammy for Truck Fleets: Ticket ‘Inflation’ and ‘Malicious Compliance’

Ticket fees have escalated dramatically and there appears to be a trend toward "malicious compliance," all for the sake of generating revenue. It's not uncommon for multiple tickets to be issued for the same violation due to overlapping regulations and the 'latitude' of interpretation afforded to officers. Plus, officers are providing fewer warnings and increasingly citing minor infractions, especially equipment violations. Increased citations negatively impact a fleet's DOT rating under CSA.

New ARI Brief Helps Fleets Remain CSA 2010 Compliant

MT. LAUREL, NJ - Automotive Resources International (ARI) has prepared a new informational brief for fleet managers and drivers who want to remain compliant under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's new regulatory protocol, Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010 (CSA 2010).

Comprehensive Safety Analysis 2010: A New Way to Reduce Truck-Related Fatalities

Due to staffing constraints, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA ) can currently only audit about 2 percent of nation's truck fleets. In response to these resource constraints, FMCSA is developing a Comprehensive Safety Analysis (CSA) 2010 initiative to implement new ways to reduce truck-related accidents. CSA 2010 will measure a fleet's safety performance through data uploaded from fleet compliance activities and accident reports.