The national average for gas prices dropped 2 cents this week, with a majority of state averages seeing minor drops and a few states in the Midwest witnessing price drops ranging from a nickel to a dime. - Graphic: AAA

The national average for gas prices dropped 2 cents this week, with a majority of state averages seeing minor drops and a few states in the Midwest witnessing price drops ranging from a nickel to a dime.

Graphic: AAA

The national average for gas prices dropped 2 cents this week, with a majority of state averages seeing minor drops and a few states in the Midwest witnessing price drops ranging from a nickel to a dime, according to AAA.

“Summer may be fading into the rearview mirror, but less expensive gas prices are not,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson. “Moving into fall we traditionally see a drop in demand and further savings at the pump. This year that means pump prices could possibly push even lower than we’ve already seen in 2020.”

A small handful of states with increases saw a jump of a penny or two, with the exception of Florida, which saw prices increase by 6 cents.

At $2.21, today’s average is two cents less than last week, one penny more than last month and 35 cents cheaper than a year ago. The national gas price average during the unofficial start and stop to summer, Memorial Day through Labor Day, was $2.15 – the cheapest since 2004. 

The nation’s top 10 largest weekly decreases were Ohio (down 11 cents), Indiana (down 9 cents), Kentucky (down 6 cents), Michigan (down 6 cents), Wisconsin (down 5 cents), North Carolina (down 4 cents), Illinois (down 4 cents), South Carolina (down 4 cents), Washington, D.C. (down 3 cents) and Oklahoma (down 3 cents).

Meanwhile, the nation’s least expensive markets are Mississippi ($1.88), Texas ($1.89), Oklahoma ($1.90), Louisiana ($1.91), Arkansas ($1.91), Missouri ($1.92), Alabama ($1.93), South Carolina ($1.96), Tennessee ($1.96) and Kansas ($2.00).

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