The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Preventing Holiday Season Road Rage

December 13, 2017

VIDEO: Fatal Road Rage in Seattle

During heavy holiday traffic, driver stress levels can elevate and the risk of road rage can rise as well. Fleet drivers need to remember what measures they can take to help prevent road rage incidents.

Here are some tips, provided by AAA, on how to avoid becoming a road rage victim:

  • Don’t give other drivers a reason to feel offended. When you merge, make sure you have plenty of room and use your turn signal to show your intentions before making a move. If you’re in the left lane and someone wants to pass, move over and let the vehicle by.
  • Don’t tailgate — allow at least a three-second space between your vehicle and the vehicle ahead.
  • Don’t let an aggressive driver tempt you to retaliate. Keep your cool and continue your trip. Give angry drivers lots of room. If the other driver tries to pick a fight, put as much distance between your vehicle and the other vehicle as possible.
  • Don’t, under any circumstances, pull off to the side of the road and try to settle things in a physical confrontation.
  • Avoid eye contact if another driver is acting angry with you.
  • If you believe another driver is following you or is trying to start a fight, get help. Don’t get out of your vehicle, and don’t go home. Contact the police or drive to a place where there are people around, such as a police station, convenience store, shopping center or even a hospital. Use your horn to get someone’s attention. This will usually discourage an aggressor.
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