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Caterpillar Introduces Euro III Compliant C13 with ACERT Technology

April 26, 2005

MOSSVILLE, IL — Caterpillar announced on April 20 the development of a Euro III emissions compliant C13 engine with ACERT Technology, which will be available beginning in July.The C9 already is certified to Euro III and is available. Over time, the entire Caterpillar engine line will be certified to Euro III, and these engines will replace the previous Cat models that have been available for several years.The power and torque of the C13 engine are ideally matched to the European driving environment. It provides a perfect payload-pulling package with a high power-to-weight ratio, excellent fuel economy, reliability and million-mile durability. Available ratings will include 395 horsepower (400 PS), 445 hp (450 PS) and 485 maximum hp (490 PS) with peak torque at 1,450 lb-ft, 1,550 lb-ft and 1,650 lb-ft at 1,200 rpm and a governed speed of 2,100 rpm. Caterpillar also is working on a 500 maximum hp rating that will provide 1,750 lb-ft of torque at 1,200 rpm and a governed speed of 2,100 rpm. These C13 engines use the same platform as those that meet the Environmental Protection Agency's 2004 standard. The C9 is ideally suited to many passenger coach and transit bus applications, as is the case in North America. The current Euro III ratings available for the C9 include 350 hp (355 PS) with 1,050 lb-ft (1,428 Nm) of torque at 1,400 rpm and a governed speed of 2,100 rpm; and 350 hp (355 PS) with 1,100 lb-ft (1,496 Nm) of torque at 1,400 rpm and a governed speed of 2,100 rpm. These C9 engines use the same platform as those that meet the EPA's 2004 standard.Most countries around the world are adopting European influenced emissions standards and will require engines with the capability to advance to that level. Cat engines with ACERT Technology provide a platform to transition from Euro III emissions standards to Euro IV and Euro V and beyond, according to the company.The Euro IV-compliant Cat engines do not require the use of urea and, consequently, can power on-highway vehicles anywhere in the world with the confidence that they will meet, and continue to meet, the emissions regulations of the region.
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