The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Court Backs California in Ethanol Dispute

August 11, 2003

California Governor Gray Davis on Wednesday, August 7, urged the federal U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reverse its requirement requiring ethanol or other oxygenate additives in the state's fuels, reports the Associated Press. A ruling last month by the San Francisco appeals court ordered the EPA to review its decision of two years ago, when the EPA denied the state's request to waive the requirement. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sent the case back to a lower court after ruling the EPA abused its discretion in refusing to consider the effect of the waiver on particulate matter pollution, along with the effects on ozone levels. Also on August 7, U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said new information from the state EPA suggests that using ethanol would increase smog in Southern California areas already experiencing an unusually severe smog season. Davis argued that state and private experts and the EPA's "Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline" have concluded the additives are not needed in California's cleaner-burning gasoline. According to Feinstein, "The bottom line is that it is counter-productive to force California to use ethanol in its gasoline that it does not need and is potentially detrimental to its air quality". EPA spokeswoman Lisa Fasano said the appeals court ruling and the agency's next step still are under review.
Twitter Facebook Google+


Please note that comments may be moderated. 
Leave this field empty:

Fleet Incentives

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

Sponsored by

During the period of 1920-1924,Chrysler teamed up with three ex-Studebaker engineers, Fred Zeder, Owen Skelton and Carl Breer, to design a revolutionary new car. They defined what the products of the Chrysler brand would be  affordable "luxury" vehicles known for innovative, top-flight engineering.

Read more

Up Next

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher