The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

natural gas vehicles (NGV)

[text compiled from the Department of Transportation's official definitions]  Dedicated natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are designed to run only on natural gas; bi-fuel NGVs have two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use either natural gas or a conventional fuel (gasoline or diesel). In general, dedicated NGVs demonstrate better performance and have lower emissions than bi-fuel vehicles because their engines are optimized to run on natural gas. In addition, the vehicle does not have to carry two types of fuel, thereby increasing cargo capacity and reducing weight.

Natural gas vehicles are fueled with compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG). These fuels are considered alternative fuels under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and qualify for alternative fuel vehicle tax credits. As a new twist, tests are being conducted using natural gas vehicles fueled with HCNG, a blend of CNG and hydrogen.

Compared with vehicles fueled with conventional diesel and gasoline, NGVs can produce significantly lower amounts of harmful emissions. In addition, some natural gas vehicle owners report service lives two to three years longer than gasoline or diesel vehicles and extended time between required maintenance.

The driving range of NGVs generally is less than that of comparable gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles because of the lower energy content of natural gas. Extra storage tanks can increase range, but the additional weight may displace payload capacity. NGV horsepower, acceleration, and cruise speed are comparable with those of an equivalent conventionally fueled vehicle.




Natural Gas

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