The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

AAA

AAA is the well-known and more commonly used acronym for the American Automobile Association, a federation of independently operated motor clubs throughout North America. AAA is a not-for-profit member service organization with more than 51 million members (according to its website). AAA provides services to its members such as travel, automotive, insurance, financial, and discounts. Its national headquarters are in Heathrow, Florida.

AAA does regular research on driver safety and has been active recently in developing safe driving guidelines, especially in regards to cellphone use, texting, and driving while distracted, and has most recently been advocating for bans on texting while driving.

In a January 2011 report in Automotive Fleet, we reported on the following activities of the AAA.

"Last year showed states' strong commitment to traffic safety as nearly a dozen states enacted laws banning texting while driving, but there were also real safety improvements on core needs like teen driver safety, primary seatbelt laws and child passenger safety," said AAA Vice President of Public Affairs Kathleen Marvaso. "AAA is working with legislators and other safety advocates in statehouses across the country to draft and pass legislation in 2011 that will make roads safer."

AAA said its main traffic safety priorities in the states include:

  • Texting while driving bans: AAA in 2009 launched a national campaign to pass laws banning text messaging while driving in all 50 states. With 11 states having enacted these laws in 2010, there are now 30 states with laws prohibiting drivers of all ages from texting. AAA expects nearly every one of the 20 remaining states to consider this legislation in 2011.
  • Primary seatbelt laws: After a record-setting year in 2009, 2010 saw modest reforms as Kansas tightened its seatbelt law to allow primary enforcement by police and Georgia closed a loophole in its law that exempted pickup truck occupants from the state's seatbelt requirement. AAA and other safety advocates will continue to work to pass reforms in the remaining 19 states without a primary belt law, as well as attempt to increase fines in some states with weak penalties, AAA said. Primary seatbelt laws have been shown as a low-cost way for states to quickly increase belt use, reduce traffic deaths, and lower the cost of crashes.
  • Move over laws: Nearly every state (49 states) has a law that requires drivers to slow down and, if safe, "move over" when passing an emergency vehicle that is actively working on a roadway. Virginia reformed its law in 2010 to include tow trucks and other road service vehicles, increasing the number of states with these more comprehensive laws to 39. AAA said it will continue to promote these laws that have been shown to improve safety for police, tow truck operators, and others who work on roadways. 
  • Teen driver safety: Although every state has some form of graduated driver licensing for new teen drivers, nearly every state still has opportunities to improve these lifesaving laws, according to AAA. States such as Alabama, Louisiana, Michigan and Oklahoma passed significant reforms in 2010, such as increasing the age and requirements for getting a license, banning the use of wireless communications devices for novice drivers, and adding or tightening limits on teen passengers and nighttime driving for newly licensed teens. Just five states (Delaware, Indiana, New York, Oklahoma and West Virginia) have graduated driver licensing systems that meet AAA's guidelines for nighttime limits, passenger limits and practice requirements.
  • Booster seat laws: Three states (Arizona, Florida and South Dakota) lack booster seat requirements, which have been shown to improve safety for young passengers. Colorado enacted a law in 2010 to allow the primary enforcement of its booster seat requirement. Booster seat laws in 21 states still fall short of meeting safety experts' guidelines, which includes all children under age 8, AAA said.

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