The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

10 Cars Americans Don't Want to Buy Anymore

April 15, 2015

Less than 4,000 Honda Insights were sold in 2014. Photo via Honda
Less than 4,000 Honda Insights were sold in 2014. Photo via Honda

The 10 vehicles that spent the longest time on dealer lots in 2014 has been released. The Honda Insight had the longest time to turn spending an average of 100 days longer on a lot than any other vehicle, according to a report from 24/7 Wall St.

Long turnover time is a result of low car sales and many of these vehicles will be discontinued if they are not already, said Tim Fleming, analyst for Kelley Blue Book, in an interview with 24/7 Wall St.

High turnover time isn’t always due to unpopularity, but rather that it was popular or unpopular relative to the manufacturer’s expectations.

The vehicle faring the best on the list was the Cadillac ATS, with an average of 138.1 days in inventory. The ATS is one of three Cadillac models with the longest days to turn. The Kia Cadenza spent 138.8 average days in inventory, followed by the Volvo XC90, FIAT 500L, Cadillac XTS, Buick Verano, Infiniti Q60, Cadillac ELR, Nissan GT-R, and the vehicle on the bottom of the list was the Honda Insight. In 2014 the Honda Insight took an average of 171 days to sell. The industry-wide average is around 71 days to turn. One possible reasoning behind the long period of time on dealer lots is due to the declining gas prices in the U.S., resulting in less fuel-efficient vehicles being purchased.

Cadillac produced three cars on this list with the longest turnover times. "These vehicles all launched recently as sort of a resurgence for Cadillac," Fleming said. However, "the inventory was not managed properly."

Fleming notes that long turnover time is normal for older vehicles, but “when there’s a newer product that isn’t selling, that’s never a good sign.”

KBB also provided average turnover times from previous years in addition to unit sales figures by make. Click here to read more details.

Twitter Facebook Google+

Comments

Please note that comments may be moderated. 
Leave this field empty:
 
 

Fleet Incentives

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

Sponsored by

George Frink joined General Motors in 1966 to help the automaker boost its corporate fleet activity through the GM Fleet Section.

Read more

Lifecycle Costs Analyzer

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

Fleet Incentives

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

Up Next

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher