The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

GM Details How it Achieved High Level of Driver Visibility in the Cadillac ATS

March 07, 2013

GM said its engineers used advanced computer modeling to help evaluate driver visibility in the all-new Cadillac ATS. The company said this method allowed for a quick evaluation of how design changes affected the driver's field of view. Photo courtesy GM.
GM said its engineers used advanced computer modeling to help evaluate driver visibility in the all-new Cadillac ATS. The company said this method allowed for a quick evaluation of how design changes affected the driver's field of view. Photo courtesy GM.

GM posted a story on its site detailing how its engineers went about ensuring its 2013 Cadillac ATS provides the driver with a high level of visibility by using new visibility metrics. They evaluated a number of factors, including the exterior mirror and A-pillar size, seat height, forward vision distance, side vision distance, and whether any interior features blocked the view through a window (for example headrests).

GM said its engineers were able to achieve a high internal score for forward visibility by keeping the hood low and slimming the A pillars by using high-strength steel. They also positioned the A pillars a wide distance apart, and angled them toward the driver, to give the driver a broad field of view that requires minimal head movements. They also said they designed a narrow support structure for the exterior rear-view mirrors.

Other visibility aids include an available rear-view camera, which features “dynamic guidelines” that show the vehicle’s path and available space when parking.

Preserving driver visibility is challenging with today’s vehicles due to aerodynamics, safety, and design requirements, according to the automaker. For example, GM said steeply raked windshields and A pillars required to improve aerodynamics leads to visibility challenges. Also, thicker roof pillars needed to accommodate air bags, and higher deck lids in the back to provide cargo room, also can mean less visibility.

To engineer these changes, GM’s Cadillac division said it used a new digital display technique (called the “hedgehog” by the company’s engineers) to examine how the A pillars affect a driver’s sightlines. The tool allows the company’s engineers to see how changes in windshield angle or section size affect sightlines, including in different driving scenarios.

Twitter Facebook Google+

Comments

Please note that comments may be moderated. 
Leave this field empty:
 
 

Fleet Incentives

Determine the actual cost of owning and running a vehicle in your fleet. Compare vehicles by class and model.

FleetFAQ

Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Todd Ewing from Fleetmatics will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Fleet Management And Leasing

Merchants Experts will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Sponsored by

ZAP Jonway is a newly formed US-China automaker that states it is focused on commercializing cost-effective electric and advanced technology vehicles for global markets. 

Read more

Up Next

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher