The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Driver Tips for Improving Visibility at Night

November 04, 2009

For all drivers, it's more difficult to see what's ahead at night compared to the day. Since the end of daylight savings time generally means more night-time hours behind the wheel, we thought this was a good time to revisit some driver tips on improving visibility after the sun goes down. You may want to pass these tips along to your fleet drivers. The tips come from the Kentucky Driver Manual.

  • Use your high beams whenever there are no oncoming vehicles, except when fog or other inclement weather would make low beams more appropriate.
  • Properly adjusted high beams let you see twice as far as low beams. It is very important to use them on unfamiliar roads, in construction areas, or where there may be people along the side of the road.
  • Dim your lights whenever you come within 500 feet of an oncoming vehicle and when you are following another vehicle within 200 feet.
  • Slow down and use low beams in fog, snow or heavy rain. The light from high beams will reflect back and cause glare during these conditions.
  • If the lights of an oncoming vehicle remain on high beam, dim your lights and look toward the right side of the road. This will keep you from being blinded by the oncoming vehicle's headlights. Do not try to "get back" at the other driver by keeping your bright lights on. If you do, both of you may be blinded.

If you are restricted to wearing corrective lenses, remember the following:

  • Always wear your corrective lenses when you drive. If you are not wearing them and you happen to be stopped by a police officer, you may be issued a citation.
  • Avoid using dark glasses or tinted contact lenses at night. They cut down the light and make it more difficult to see.
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