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New Volvo Technology Helps Drivers Avoid Accidents with Pedestrians

December 23, 2008

GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN – Volvo Cars is introducing the next generation of preventive safety technology. Collision warning with full auto brake and pedestrian detection reacts when a pedestrian walks out in front of a car — and will activate the car’s full braking power if the driver does not respond to the danger.

This new innovation is being presented in the Volvo S60 Concept, to be unveiled for the first time at the Detroit Motor Show in early January. This safety innovation is the next step in Volvo Cars’ continuous development of technologies that detect dangerous situations and that actively help the driver avoid an accident.

“The previous stages were developed to help the driver avoid collisions with other vehicles. Now we are taking a giant step forward with a feature that also boosts safety for unprotected road-users. What is more, we are now advancing from 50 percent to full automatic braking power. To our knowledge, none of our competitors have made such progress in this area,” explains Thomas Broberg, safety expert at Volvo Cars. He adds:“This technology helps us take an important step towards our long-term vision of designing cars that should not crash. Our aim for 2020 is that no one should be killed or injured in a Volvo car.”

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