The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Global Congestion Costing Commercial Drivers

February 21, 2017

Photo via Wikimedia.
Photo via Wikimedia.

The cost of traffic congestion increased in 2016 to an average of $1,400 for U.S. drivers, as congestion worsened in Los Angeles, which has become the most congested city in the world, according to the Inrix Traffic Scorecard.

Congestion takes its toll on commercial vehicles, costing company drivers directly in the value of fuel and lost productivity, as well as indirectly in freight and business fees from, idling fleet vehicles that are passed on by companies to households through higher prices.

U.S. cities dominated the top 10 list on the scorecard, which analyzed 1,064 cities in 38 countries, including 240 in the U.S. The U.S. ranked highest with an average of 42 hours in traffic during peak hours.

Los Angeles surpassed Moscow as the most congested city in 2016, where drivers spend an average of 104.1 hours in congested traffic. The congestion is Los Angeles costs drivers an average of $2,408 in direct and indirect costs. 

Other U.S. cities on the list include New York City (third with 89.4 hours), San Francisco (fourth with 82.6 hours), and Atlanta (ninth with 70.8 hours). Miami came in at 11 with 64.8 hours. Other global cities include Moscow (second with 91.4), Colombia's Bogota (fifth with 79.8 hours), Sao Paulo (sixth with 77.2 hours), London (eighth with 73.4 hours), and Russia's Magnitogorsk (ninth with 71.1 hours).

View the full scorecard here.

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