The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Bright Ideas: Technology

This special issue offers a collection of 150 best practices, proven solutions, and creative new concepts in successful fleet management, gathered from fleet manager surveys, news, and industry coverage. This section focuses on how technology can save time and money.

July 2009, by Staff

Automated Pool Systems Reduce Downtime
Use of an automated vehicle pool can also save costs. Dale Beaudry, roads and equipment superintendent at the City of Kelowna, B.C., Rick Longobart, fleet manager at the City of Inglewood, Calif., and Mitch Guenthart, fleet manager at the  County of Santa Barbara, Calif., represent a few fleets that have discovered the benefits of using an automated vehicle pool system. Benefits include reduced downtime, increased security, and lower maintenance and repair costs. A system such as this can also add convenience. Keys can be stored at the same location as the car and can be accessed after hours, eliminating the need for employees to use their personal vehicles.

$20,000: Savings due to automated vehicle pool use by City of Inglewood, Calif., in the program’s first year.

"Perform an annual technology assessment prior to budget development and include customer vehicles and equipment. Look for multiple-use equipment to replace low-use assets. Assess the shop for time-saving technology for technicians or that makes the shop a safer workplace."
—Jim Wright, president, Fleet Counselor Services

"The State of Illinois implemented a trip cost calculator comparing reimbursement to use of a state vehicle and commercial rental. The state fleet also implemented an enhanced fleet request template that analyzes the most cost effective transportation solutions."
—Barb Bonansinga, fleet manager, Ill. Central Mgmt. Services

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