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Valvoline Offers Oil for Natural Gas, Diesel, and Gasoline Engines

March 07, 2018, by Deborah Lockridge - Also by this author

Valvoline's Premium Blue One Solution 9200 engine oil is approved for use in natural gas, diesel, and gasoline engines. Image: Valvoline
Valvoline's Premium Blue One Solution 9200 engine oil is approved for use in natural gas, diesel, and gasoline engines. Image: Valvoline

Valvoline says its new Premium Blue One Solution 9200 is the first engine oil approved for use in natural gas, diesel, and gasoline engines.

“The purpose of Premium Blue One Solution is to dramatically simplify the fill process for fleet managers, enabling one proven product to be used across a number of engine applications,” said David Young, vice president of Valvoline Heavy Duty, in an announcement at the Technology & Maintenance Council’s annual meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

Valvoline Premium Blue One Solution was initially developed as part of Valvoline’s close relationship with Cummins Westport, which has introduced a new series of low-emission natural gas engines.

The resulting engine oil is available in 10W-30 and 15W-40 SAE viscosity grades. Valvoline says it offers excellent oxidation resistance and TBN retention to support long oil life. At the same time, Valvoline says, it offers outstanding wear protection and superior deposit protection compared to industry requirements. And the viscosity shear stability is “amazing,” says Roger England, technical director. As a result, Valvoline says oil drain intervals will be able to be extended.

Valvoline Premium Blue One Solution meets API API CK-4 diesel category and API SN gasoline requirements. It’s endorsed by Cummins and meets the new Cummins CES 20092 spec for natural gas engines, as well as CES 20086 and CES 20085 approvals. It also meets Mack EOS-4.5, Volvo VDS-4.5, and Detroit Diesel DFS 93K222 specs.

“While there were previously oils in the marketplace that could be used in diesel and gas engines, there was not one approved across all fuel types – until now,” Young added.

England told HDT that the ability to develop a single oil for the three types of engines was made possible by changes in engine combustion technology. As today’s engines have been designed to be more efficient, he explained, they run hotter and at higher pressures – which present oil challenges similar to those faced by oils for natural gas engines.

Pricing is still being finalized, but the oil will be priced similar to other natural gas oils, which is higher than typical diesel oils.

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