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The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Ford Offers Replacement Parts for Non-Ford Vehicles

January 24, 2017

Omnicraft
Omnicraft

Ford’s Customer Service Division has launched Omnicraft, an all-new brand of replacement parts that will be available to all Ford dealers.

This is the first time in 50 years that Ford’s Customer Service Division has announced a new brand, and it’s expected to act as a growth opportunity for Ford dealerships as the parts will be compatible with all makes, including non-Ford vehicles, according to the automaker.

“Omnicraft is a significant benefit to any vehicle owner who needs parts or to have their vehicle serviced,” said Frederiek Toney, president, Global Ford Customer Service Division. “Now, owners of non-Ford vehicles have access to quality parts at a competitive price, backed by Ford and installed by Ford’s world-class certified technicians.”

In order to build a solid foundation of inventory for its dealers, Ford stated that during its initial launch 1,500 of the most commonly requested parts will be available. This includes parts such as oil filters, brake pads and rotors, loaded struts, and starters and alternators.

As time goes on, Ford plans to reach 30 parts categories and expand its list of available parts to 10,000. During the launch period, Omnicraft parts will only be available at Ford and Lincoln dealerships. However, the new brand will become available to other Ford authorized distributors throughout 2017.

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