The Car and Truck Fleet and Leasing Management Magazine

Minn. Fleet Boosts Use of E85

February 22, 2010

SAINT PAUL, MN - In 2009, E85 fuel accounted for 15 percent of the total fuel used by Minnesota state agencies' light duty vehicles, according to a new report. That's substantially more than in 2008. 

The report, released by the SmartFleet Committee, found that in 2009 Minnesota state agencies used 816,568 gallons of E85, up from 650,036 gallons used in 2008. The state's Higher Education office topped all other state agencies with nearly 79 percent use of E85. Other top agency users of E85 included Agriculture, the Governor's Office, Mediation Services and Revenue. 

The SmartFleet Committee is a group that tracks fuel use and encourages state employees to use E85 in the 2,500 flex fuel vehicles in the state fleet.

An executive order signed by Gov. Tim Pawlenty calls for Minnesota state agencies to reduce the quantity of petroleum fuels consumed in transportation. E85 contains up to 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline. 

Earlier this month, President Obama's Biofuels Interagency Working Group also issued a report encouraging federal, state and local governments to increase their use of biofuels in fleet vehicles. 

"Minnesota doesn't have any fossil fuel resources of our own," said Tim Morse, chair of the SmartFleet Committee. "It is important for state government to lead by example as we all look for alternative transportation choices that are cleaner, renewable and made here at home." 

Minnesota has more than 350 public and fleet E85 refueling stations. For more information about station locations and flex-fuel vehicles, visit

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