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UN Vehicle Regulations Could Cut Latin America Road Deaths

October 26, 2016

If UN vehicle safety regulations were applied by four key Latin American countries, 40,000  lives could be saved and 400,000 serious injuries prevented by 2030, according to a new report by Global NCAP and the Inter-American Development Bank.

The UK Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) conducted the independent study and its findings are closely aligned with the policy recommendations adopted by the United Nations and consistent with Global NCAP’s recommended "Road Map 2020 for Safer Cars."

The aim of the study was to predict how many car user deaths and injuries could be prevented in four Latin American countries: Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Brazil, by establishing minimum car safety regulations and consumer testing. The major regulations that were considered were United Nations (UN) Regulations No. 14, 16 (seat belts and anchorages), 94 (occupant protection in frontal collision) and 95 (occupant protection in side or lateral collisions), according to the report.

The study concluded that up to 40,000 car occupant fatalities and 400,000 serious injuries could be prevented between 2016 and 2030, if minimum vehicle safety standards were applied. Economic assessment suggests that these casualty reductions could save up to US$143 billion over the period 2016 to 2030.

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